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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

3 edition of Remarks on the Indian languages of North America found in the catalog.

Remarks on the Indian languages of North America

Pickering, John

Remarks on the Indian languages of North America

by Pickering, John

  • 191 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by s.n. in [S.l .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Indians of North America -- Languages.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesEncyclopedia Americana.
    Statementby John Pickering.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination1 microfiche (16 fr.).
    Number of Pages16
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22139476M
    ISBN 10066526755X

    There are about , speakers of North American indigenous languages of which , speak Navajo (one of the few languages that is prospering). According to the USA census, , people speak there an indigenous language, and according to the Canada census about , speak a native language in the country. book) is superb. Campbell’s book focuses on language classi cation and includes all the Americas rather than just North America. It is an excellent work, but Goddard’s chapter in Vol. 17 on the classi cation of the North American languages, besides being conveniently succinct, does .

    But for many Native American nations, their ancestral languages are on the verge of disappearing. Over many generations, numerous Native American languages were nearly all but wiped out after the European settlement of North America. However, linguists are working with Native communities to help revitalize these traditions. Today, North America only has a total of living languages. However, out of those languages, are in the realm of extinction. That is, 92% of languages that are dying.

    American Indian Tribal List: Native American Tribes and Languages Indian Tribes Names: Partial chart of the original and current names of North American Indian tribes. First Nations Histories: Historical overviews of 48 different North American Indian tribes. Maps of Native American Nations: Maps and tribal information about American IndianFile Size: KB. The grammar of American Indian languages is characterized by diversity rather than common traits. At the same time, however, some characteristics are common enough to be considered typical of certain regions. In North American languages, for example, it is common to combine several small word elements to form a complex word.


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Remarks on the Indian languages of North America by Pickering, John Download PDF EPUB FB2

Text in English and Indian languages "From the Encyclopedia Americana, volume VI, published in " "Reprinted " In double columns Filmed from a copy of the original publication held by the Seminary of Quebec, Library 43Pages: ISBN: X OCLC Number: Notes: Text in English and Indian languages.

"From the Encyclopedia Americana, volume VI, published in ". Additional Physical Format: Print version: Pickering, John, Remarks on the Indian languages of North America. [Place of publication not identified]: [publisher not identified], [?].

'This volume is a most welcome continuation of a most useful series. it is a great pleasure to review Marianne Mithun's The Languages of Native North America in the Cambridge Language Surveys, since one can only express admiration for the tremendous amount of labour behind this book/5(9).

Abstract. This checklist is based largely on contributions of the Bureau of Ethnology of the Smithsonian Institution, particularly the bibliographies edited by James C.

Pilling, the Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico (–10) edited by F. Hodge, and J. Swanton’s Indian Tribes of North America ().

These works should be consulted as a first step in cases where the Cited by: 5. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at Title: Sign Language Among North American Indians Compared With That Among Other Peoples And Deaf-Mutes First Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution.

This book provides an authoritative survey of the several hundred languages indigenous to North America. These languages show tremendous genetic and typological diversity, and offer numerous challenges to current linguistic theory. Part I of the book provides an overview of structural features of particular interest, concentrating on those that are cross-linguistically unusual or unusually 5/5(1).

Native American languages are spoken from Siberia to Greenland, and from the Arctic to Tierra del Fuego; they include the southernmost language of the world (Yaghan) and some of the northernmost (Eskimoan).

Campbell's project is to take stock of what is currently known about the history of Native American languages and in the process examine the state of American Indian historical linguistics Reviews: 1.

This book is a comprehensive and authoritative survey of the North American Indian languages. It includes an overview of their special characteristics, descriptions of special styles, and a catalogue of the languages detailing their locations, genetic affiliations, number of speakers, and major structural features, and listing published 5/5(7).

Other resources about American Indian history, culture and society in North America: The Languages of Native North America: Excellent book overviewing North American Indian languages.

North American Languages By Population of Speakers: A list of the most spoken languages of North America. Indigenous North Americans: North American native history, tribal information, pictures. This book is a comprehensive and authoritative survey of the native North American languages.

These several hundred languages show tremendous genetic and typological diversity, and offer numerous challenges to current linguistic theory/5. Native American languages are spoken from Siberia to Greenland, and from the Arctic to Tierra del Fuego; they include the southernmost language of the world (Yaghan) and some of the northernmost (Eskimoan).Cited by: North American Indian languages, those languages that are indigenous to the United States and Canada and that are spoken north of the Mexican border.

A number of language groups within this area, however, extend into Mexico, some as far south as Central present article focuses on the native languages of Canada, Greenland, and the United States. Early Publications in American Indian Languages. The Smithsonian Libraries has one of the premier Native North American language and linguistics collections in the world, resulting from the exceptional work of the Smithsonian Institution since its founding.

A first reading book in the Micmac language: comprising the Micmac numerals, and the. Indigenous languages of the Americas are spoken by indigenous peoples from Alaska, Nunavut, and Greenland to the southern tip of South America, encompassing the land masses that constitute the indigenous languages consist of dozens of distinct language families, as well as many language isolates and unclassified languages.

Many proposals to group these into higher-level. Boas, Franz. Introduction. Handbook of American Indian Languages, Vol. 1, p. Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin Washington: Government Print Office (Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology).

Extraído de volume digitalizado pelo Internet Archive. Disponível na Biblioteca Digital Curt Nimuendaju. North American Natives, peoples who occupied North America before the arrival of the Europeans in the 15th cent.

They have long been known as Indians because of the belief prevalent at the time of Columbus that the Americas were the outer reaches of the Indies (i.e., the East Indies).

There are lots of published grammars, dictionaries, and other linguistic studies for Native North American languages. The oldest that I know of was published for the Wampanoag (Wôpanâak) language spoken in what is now Massachusetts, written by Joh. Franz Boas (–) is indigenous North America’s most significant non-Native anthropologist.

J.W. Powell (–) was the first director of the Bureau of American Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution and a strong supporter of linguistic research. Michael Silverstein is the Charles F. Grey Distinguished Service Professor of Anthropology, of Linguistics, and of Psychology at the.

The American Language Reprint Series Series Editor: Claudio R. Salvucci At 30+ volumes and growing, the American Language Reprint (ALR) series aims to compile and preserve the various Indian word-lists, vocabularies, and phrase books which were collected during the early years of North American.

Most Native American languages have ceased to exist, or are spoken only by older speakers, with whom the language will die in the coming decades.

Only 8 indigenous languages of the area of the continental United States currently have a population of speakers in the U.S. and Canada large enough to populate a medium-sized town.

Handbook of American Indian languages by Franz Boas; 12 editions; First published in ; Subjects: Accessible book, Indian languages (of America), Indians of North America, Languages, Linguistics, Indians, Language, North American Indians.American Indian languages, languages spoken by the original inhabitants of the Western Hemisphere and their modern descendants.

The American Indian languages do not form a single historically interrelated stock (as do the Indo-European languages), nor are there any structural features (in phonetics, grammar, or vocabulary) whereby American Indian languages can be distinguished as a .